The right actions for dealing with brown spots

Generally located on the face, décolleté area, arms and hands, brown spots (or lentigos) tend to proliferate with age and after the summer holidays: the sun and ageing are indeed the two major sources. To avoid seeing them multiply over time, adopt good habits as soon as possible!

Submitted on 10/10/2012

 

Things to do

  
  • Seek advice from your dermatologist who will make an accurate diagnosis of your spots and suggest a suitable treatment.
  • Avoid exposure to the sun as much as possible, particularly during the summer.
  • Use sun protection with a protection factor of SPF 30 to 50+ on exposed areas (face, décolleté, arms, etc.) in all seasons and even when you do not plan to bask in the sun.
  • Take particular care to avoid exposure to the sun if you are pregnant to reduce the risk of developing the well-known "pregnancy mask" or chloasma (related to both hormonal changes and exposure to UV rays).
  • If the spots are numerous and pronounced, consider a laser or flash lamp treatment, which can be performed by a specialised dermatologist.
  • Use a depigmenting cream morning and evening such as Melatrio Intensive Depigmenting Skincare by Noviderm. Used alone or to relay laser treatment, it will help fade these spots and prevent new spots from appearing.
  • Check that the products and / or medications you are using are not photosensitising.
  • Do not hesitate to use make-up: concealers and foundations will help you even-out your complexion in the blink of an eye and help to protect you.
  • Carefully protect your children from the sun: in addition to the immediate risks, sunburn in childhood promotes the appearance of moles and age spots in adulthood.


Things not to do

  
  • Apply sun protection only once a day: to be effective and retain its protection factor, sun lotion must be reapplied at least four times a day (morning, before breakfast, after lunch, and finally in the afternoon).
  • Avoid using sun protection on overcast days: while the heat is less intense than on a sunny day, the UV rays pass through clouds and the risks for your skin remain the same.
  • Expose your face directly to the sun, even with a cream with a very high sun protection factor: a sunscreen is not a shield and areas with brown spots should always remain in the shade.

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